Jorge Losoya

GRA-Solis Collins- GF: Boil Water Notice

Master of Science in Community and Regional Planning, Master of Arts in Latin American Studies

Jorge Losoya is a second-year dual master's degree student in the M.S. Community and Regional Planning and M.A. Latin American Studies programs (2018 - 2021). He received a bachelor's degree in Geography and Urban Studies from the University of Texas at Austin (2014 - 2018). Jorge has been a Graduate Assistant working with Dr. Miriam Solis, researching the boil water notice that took place in Austin Fall 2018. Previously he worked as a program assistant for the Environmental Defense Fund's Cuba Oceans program. 

Broadly, Jorge is interested in environmental justice, equity, environmental planning, radical planning, and disaster planning. He is currently working on his master's thesis focused on forced government displacement of marginalized communities. Jorge's project is based on an informal settlement in Santo Domingo, the Dominican Republic along the Ozama River. He is particularly interested in the ties between environmental and political factors that drive displacement, reproduce inequalities, and further segregate cities. 

Vice President, Community and Regional Planning Student Organization (CRPSO)
Conference Chair, Institute of Latin American Studies Student Association (ILASSA)

Eric Nava-Perez

Teaching Assistant

Master of Science in Community and Regional Planning, Master of Arts in Latin American Studies

Mary Stycos

Graduate Research Assistant

Master of Science in Community and Regional Planning, Master of Arts in Latin American Studies

  @UTSOA

Juan Tiney Chirix

Teaching Assistant

Master of Science in Community and Regional Planning, Master of Arts in Latin American Studies

I am a young Maya-Kaqchiquel-Tzutujil from Guatemala, currently enrolled in a dual master’s degree (2016-2019) in Latin American Studies and Community and Regional Planning (CRP). I received a bachelor’s degree in Economics from the University of Havana, Cuba (2009-2014). I am currently finishing my master's thesis on "cooperatives as a space for political and economic empowerment for black and indigenous women of Guatemala and the Dominican Republic. Among the main questions that guided this master's thesis, are: How are these cooperatives shaped by the construction of indigenous and black gender in Guatemala and the Dominican Republic? How do these cooperatives promote the empowerment of women? The study on the constitution of cooperatives, the construction of gender, and racial identities, from these analytical categories, I try, in some way to decolonize the academia through the recognition of knowledge of the so-called "global south."